Skyscrapers of Europe

Where are Europe’s tallest buildings located? And which country has the most?


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Map of the skyscrapers in Europe

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Europe is not necessarily known for its skyscrapers. Most European cities are famous for their old town centres and majestic historic buildings. Because of those historic city centres, most European cities haven’t built many, if any skyscrapers.

There are almost 250 buildings in Europe that are over 150 meters (492 feet) high. Half of them are located in only 3 cities: Moscow, Istanbul and London.

Europe’s skyscrapers are mostly concentrated in a small number of countries. Even in those countries, the skyscrapers are mostly concentrated in one city. Most of Russia’s skyscrapers are in Moscow, Turkey’s in Istanbul, the UK’s in London, France’s in Paris and Germany’s skyscrapers are mostly in Frankfurt.

The tallest building in Europe is the Laktha Center in St. Petersburg. With a height of 462 meters (1,516 ft).

The data for this map is gathered from CTUBH (Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat) and Emporis. The buildings are measured by their architectural height. The architectural height measures from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized.

Only buildings are included in this map. Also included are buildings that are still under construction, but have already topped out. Telecommunications towers and observation towers are not included.

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